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The House

The Hull House is the oldest stone dwelling in Erie County, New York. Built c.1810 by Warren Hull for his wife, Polly, and their children, the federal style dwelling was built into a hill so that, from the street, two stories are apparent. From the back, however, the basement level is accessible. Throughout the house, one can find the original woodwork in flooring, doorways, some original windows, window seats, stairways, banisters and fireplace mantels and jambs.



The main floor of the house consists of an entrance hallway with a common room (kitchen), pantry and back hallway on the right (east) and the parlor and sitting room on the left (west). The two original fireplaces in the parlor and the sitting room are still in place, while the larger common room fireplace that had at one time been removed, is now fully restored.



The second story includes the Hulls’ master bedchamber and the boys’ bedchamber on the left (west) and the girls’ bedroom  (the north bedchamber) on the right. The original fireplaces in all these rooms are still intact. A small room at the top of the staircase may have been an office for Mr. Hull or a bedchamber for hired help.


In the attic (or garret) one can see the 40-foot hand-hewn timber that serves as the main beam under the gabled roof. The four chimneys have been restored along with the oval windows facing east and west.



In the basement stands the large kitchen hearth which has been restored. The original cistern lies beneath the basement floor. It was used to collect rainwater for household use. The most unique feature, however, is the original beehive oven which is in such good condition that it could still be used for cooking.